Lexicon Systems, LLC Blog

lex'•i•con: the vocabulary of a branch of knowledge. Thoughts on environment, health & safety (EHS), sustainability and information technology to support them.


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Office 2016 for Mac available to Cloud subscribers

Late last week, Microsoft made the long-awaited Office 2016 for Mac available to Office 365 subscribers. The last Mac version was in 2011. Is the new software suite worth the five-year wait?

Microsoft says the software is “unmistakably Office, designed for Mac.”

Microsoft’s July 9 announcement: Office 2016 for Mac is here!

Per Microsoft’s blog post, Office for Mac is now available to Office 365 subscribers (annual subscription fee) , and will be available for stand-alone purchase (one-time license fee) in September.

Simple installation

This afternoon, I installed the software on my MacBook Pro Retina. The installation package

  • includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and OneNote,
  • requires less than 2 GB of hard disk space, and
  • takes less than five minutes to install.
Install Office 2016 for Mac from the Microsoft Office 365 portal

Install Office 2016 for Mac from the Microsoft Office 365 portal

The new Office applications integrate with the OneDrive Cloud app. Through Cloud integration, you can start a document or spreadsheet on one device–say your laptop–and then view or edit it on your tablet or smartphone. You can share files and collaborate with others. When you save files to the Cloud, you do not have to worry about which version is the latest.

Decades of experience demand full-featured software

I have used Microsoft Office more than any other office productivity suite. Having used PCs of all shapes and sizes for decades, I have tried a number of office productivity software suites. I started with VisiWord/VisiCalc and Lotus 1-2-3. I graduated to IBM DisplayWrite and WordPerfect. Then I earned my “Master’s” in Microsoft Office. And, most recently, I learned Apple iWork (Pages, Numbers and Keynote) and Apple Mail basics.

I am a recent Mac convert. We Mac users like the clean, simple-to-use hardware, and want full-featured software that provides a great user experience.

I eagerly loaded the Office 2016 for Mac beta onto my MacBook Pro this spring. Its interface was, very Windows-like and familiar. That was good. But the software lacked several features I thought should be standard all users–Windows and Mac. With Macs becoming more and more popular in the business world, it’s time for feature equality.

Microsoft says that they received significant input from Mac users during the Office for Mac redesign.

My MacBook, which rarely crashes, did just that repeatedly with the Office 2016 beta. When my expense report spreadsheet–a simple Excel table–was corrupted by the beta, I could not open it with Excel of any version. I opened it with Apple’s Numbers, and reconverted it to Excel. A major inconvenience with time lost, but I did not lose the data altogether. I had to revert to the Office 2011 for Mac software. Ugh!

First impressions

Will Office 2016 for Mac live up to my expectations as a person who cut my teeth on the Windows versions? Time will tell…

You can read TechRepublic’s first impressions on the new software here and see what’s new here.


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Urbanization, technology, demographics, and globalization are shaping a new reality

I have written a number of articles and blog posts on the impact of technology on our personal and business lives. But wait! Technology does not operate in isolation. Economics and “people” issues allow emerging technologies to succeed or fail. Technology plus other forces are creating a new reality faster than you can say “latest iPhone release.”

The world economy’s operating system is being rewritten. In the new book No Ordinary Disruption, its authors explain the trends reshaping the world and why leaders must adjust to a new reality.

Richard Dobbs, James Manyika, and Jonathan Woetzel speak of four global forces that are shaping a new reality.

  1. The age of urbanization.
  2. Accelerating technological change.
  3. Challenges of an aging world.
  4. Greater global connections.

Continue reading


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Business + technology + innovation = opportunity

woman surfingTechnology is a great business catalyst. My high school friend’s three kids—a surfer, a fashion designer, and a digital designer—raised $20K through a Kickstarter campaign to take their business to the next level. They sell surfing bikinis to urban women in San Francisco. Their claim to fame is that the bikinis stay put! See Kinda Fancy Bikinis.

Get your shift togetherA management consultant friend of mine writes writes books on intergenerational workforce issues. She self-publishes books and sells them on Amazon.com, alongside the books by thousands of other authors. Self-publishing shortens the time from concept to market by months or years. See Get Your Shift Together.

A silver and gold jewelry designer uses 3D printers to fill customer orders on demand, saving thousands of dollars that otherwise might have been tied up in inventory and precious metals stock. This designer has loads of artistic talent and communicates well with the engineers who translate her concepts into jewelry.

Business + Technology + Innovation = Opportunity

Each of these businesses cases is an example of disruptive technology. An entrepreneur takes a business idea, adds technology and innovation to create new markets, smashing traditional barriers to entry. Definitely not your mother’s or father’s business model!

Office 2016 for Mac


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Microsoft announces Office 2016 for Mac preview

Microsoft typically updates its Office suite (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook and OneNote) about every three years. And with the introduction of its Office 365 Cloud version, the software giant can tweak the software any time it wants.

What about the Mac users who rely upon MS Office? The number of Macs in the enterprise is growing, with BYOT (bring your own technology), as well as corporate adoption of the Mac platform.

The last product release was Office for Mac 2011, over five years ago. So the recent announcement of Office 2016 for Mac was welcomed by Mac aficionados. You can install the Office 2016 for Mac preview without impacting your existing Office 2011 version; you can use both–just not at the same time. Look in your App Launcher and you will see icons for both the 2011 and 2016 versions of each app.

First takes

The biggest change is the addition of OneNote, which is logical considering last year’s release of OneNote for iOS (free). Having used OneNote for Windows for over ten years, I find the Mac version lacks a few “must have” features, like the ability to

  • toggle grid lines on and off, and to print the grid if desired.
  • create reusable page templates.
  • set default paragraph (line) spacing, as well as paragraph spacing within the document.
  • use a variety of bullets, vs. one (•), when using multi-level bullet lists.
  • create and save user-specific styles, e.g. headings in different fonts, styles and colors.

Microsoft advertises Office for Mac as “the familiar office you know and love.”
Unmistakable office | Designed for Mac | Cloud Connected.

Microsoft is working to consolidate the Office brand and bring Mac users into the fold. The application icons resemble the Office 2013 Windows version icons.  I happen to like the (old) Office 2011 icons because they are more innovative, just like a Mac user expects. However, today’s design trend is “flat” user interfaces with bold colors.

Office 2016 for Mac

Photo: Microsoft

All Mac Office applications resemble their Windows counterparts, with the goal of a familiar, but simpler, user experience. I think the Mac version may suit many, but will disappoint others who expect quantum leaps in features in the new version. After all, it has been five years in the making! A few examples…

  • the ribbon interface resembles that in the Windows version. So far, in the Office 2016 for Mac preview, the user cannot move the ribbon below the menu, as is possible in the Windows version.
  • Office 2016 offers a limited number of built-in design templates (style, color and font combinations) and does not appear to take advantage of the default and built-in Mac OSX fonts (i.e., Helvetica Neue for late-model Macs, plus a laundry list of Apple fonts).
  • When opening a new file, the user can choose from a few pre-formatted letters, rėsumės, spreadsheets and presentations, but there is no link to hundreds more on the MS Office Web site. The solution: Mac users can download Windows templates and open them without losing data and formats.

Release plans

Microsoft plans to release Office for Mac 2016 in the second half of 2015. Look for it in the Mac app store. According to the Microsoft Web site, if you have an  Office 365 subscription, you will get the current version of Office for Mac, free.

I look forward to the official rollout. As an ex-Windows user, I will continue to use and explore the capabilities of the Office for Mac Preview versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote–despite the feature gap. I don’t use Outlook, as Mac mail provides me with a consistent user experience across my smartphone, tablet and notebook. I do miss some Outlook features that Mac mail lacks, especially the seamless integration of mail, contacts, calendars and tasks and the ease of data import and export.

Those interested in downloading the preview can find it here.


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Five global predictions for 2015

Today was all about tomorrow. Let me explain… this morning, I attended a Webinar on 2015 trends in the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) market; this afternoon I completed a survey on the top global trends for 2015. Here’s my take on five global trends for 2015. The common thread is information technology (IT) and the environment.


It’s all about the Cloud

Businesses continue to move to the Cloud in droves, with a large percentage already there. A big benefit of the Cloud is the shift away from internal management of IT infrastructure, placing part of the risk onto Cloud providers. Another benefit is the ability to shift from older, “on premises” enterprise software license models that require constant upgrades to newer, Software as a Service (SaaS) apps where all user organizations are on the same version of the software. And a third benefit is anytime, anywhere access to information that allow more informed decision-making.

It’s not just mobile technology, but mobile technology enabled by the Cloud, that will allow businesses to break from old paradigms and utilize Internet-enabled solutions. My article on the Cloud will publish on 01 February 2015.

Information security remains a top concern

Information security will remain a top concern among organizations into 2015 and beyond. ApplePay went live this quarter, and it was supposed to be an alternate cashless payment method, but not a Point of Service (POS) app. With the release of the iPhone 6 and the latest iOS, Apple has teamed with Bank of America (and others?) and ApplePay is a POS app! Many remain concerned about Near Field Communications, where a cyber hacker can steal sensitive financial information.

Magnetic stripes on credit and debit cards are so 20th Century. A few years ago, many merchants tried laser bar code readers for payment cards (e.g., payments at gas pumps), but removed the readers… were the readers that hard to use, or were they too costly to maintain? After recent security breaches some U.S. banks are revamping credit card security measures–adding security “chips” that other countries have used for decades. It’s about time… but users still must “swipe” their cards through a reader.

Global energy and natural resource challenges

The U.S. is enjoying the “energy boom,” at the highest domestic production rates in decades, and needs to ensure that there is not a rapid “bust.” Despite the drop in oil prices (barrels of West Texas Intermediate Crude), North American Shale Oil plays will continue into 2015.

Cheap natural gas prices will allow the chemicals industry to continue with large projects, the scale of which we have not seen in the U.S. since the late 1970s and early 1980s. While the demand for new natural gas and liquids pipelines remains high, these projects will slow a bit. Why not deposit some of the cheap oil and gas to increase the National Petroleum Reserve?

Changing demographics and consumer spending

Many emerging countries will continue to see the largest increase in spending power in the under-35 population. The consumer population in the U.S. will continue to increase dramatically in two segments—over-60 and under 35 years old—thus creating the challenge of serving both markets.

Considering how much consumer technologies spill over into business, the challenge is applying these technologies to address the needs of divergent populations. In 2015, software applications will be all about the user experience, and the real challenge will be the balance between the user experience and addressing enterprise needs such as information security and scalability.

Cashless payments

Consumers will continue to increase their comfort level with online, cashless payments. Mobile cashless payments will take a while to gain market share amid concerns of cybersecurity and as consumers upgrade their mobile technology. Regardless of the method, companies in the payment business must move to multi-factor authentication and anonymous, one-time authorization codes that are more difficult to steal, or, if stolen, are useless.

While consumers–especially the 35-and-under demographic–have handily adopted paperless check deposits, this will not quickly spill over into the business world. Businesses will continue to remain entrenched in hard-copy checks, P-cards (Purchase Cards) and ACH (automated clearinghouse) payments in 2015. So, keep the car gassed up (or charged) for those trips to the post office and bank.

With the new year coming upon us quickly, there is plenty to think about with respect to information technology and the environment. Your thoughts?


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Each year, the Dow Jones Index Committee and sustainability investment specialist RobecoSAM review thousands of companies and identify those to include in the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI). Companies in the DJSI are recognized as sustainability leaders by independent rating organizations, as well.

Launched in 1999, the Dow Jones Sustainability Index family tracks the stock performance of the world’s leading companies in terms of economic, environmental and social criteria.

The DJSI World 2014 Review Results

The DJSI Committee develops seven indices each year. The following summary is for the DJSI World, which represents the top 10% of the largest 2,500 companies in the S&P Global BMI based on long-term economic, environmental and social criteria.

Global Sustainability Leaders

The two figures below list the 2014 leaders in 23 Industry Groups. Sixteen companies have been part of DJSI World for all fifteen years—Baxter International, Bayer, Bayerische Motoren Werke, BT Group, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Diageo, Intel, Sainsbury, Novo Nordisk, RWE, SAP, Siemens, Storebrand and Unilever.

djsi-world-industry-leaders-2014-1

  djsi-world-industry-leaders-2014-2

Top 10 Additions to DJSI World (by Market Capitalization)

  1. Commonwealth Bank of Australia
  2. GlaxoSmithKline
  3. Amgen
  4. Toronto-Dominion Bank
  5. AbbVie
  6. Caterpillar
  7. Renkitt-Benckiser Group
  8. Lockheed-Martin Group
  9. Bank of New York Mellon Group
  10. Deutsche Post AG

Top 10 Deletions from DJSI World (by Market Capitalization)

  1. General Electric
  2. Bank of America
  3. Schlumberger
  4. BHP Billiton Ltd
  5. McDonald’s
  6. BHP Billiton PLC
  7. Telefonica
  8. Starbucks,
  9. NIKE Inc
  10. Colgate-Palmolive

Learn more about DJSI indices and see the 2014 Annual Review here.