Lexicon Systems, LLC Blog

lex'•i•con: the vocabulary of a branch of knowledge. Thoughts on environment, health & safety (EHS), sustainability and information technology to support them.


Leave a comment

I hope that you have been using Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, or an Internet browser other than Internet Explorer for the last two weeks or so.

Though Microsoft ended support for its popular Windows XP operating system on 08 April 2014, recent security threats spurred the company to issue an emergency security patch on 26 April. The security vulnerability affects users of Internet Explorer versions 6-11 on various Windows operating systems.

Microsoft Internet Explorer 11 Logo

“We have made the decision to issue a security update for Windows XP users,” Dustin Childs, group manager of Microsoft Trustworthy Computing, wrote in a blog post. “Windows XP is no longer supported by Microsoft, and we continue to encourage customers to migrate to a modern operating system, such as Windows 7 or 8.1.” 

Read more…

Logo: Google

In news releases on 28 April, the US and UK governments asked people to stop using Internet Explorer (IE) until its security vulnerabilities were fixed. According to netmarketshare.com, over half of the desktop PC market used IE in one version or another when the “zero day” vulnerability was identified. Many organizations immediately switched from Internet Explorer to Google Chrome.

 

Advertisements


2 Comments

How good are your passwords?

A while back I facilitated a number of  environment, health & safety (EHS) software training sessions. Some of the trainees–mostly what I would call occasional users–needed instruction in computer fundamentals, including how to set a secure password. Some rules of thumb for what NOT to use as a password are

  1. don’t use your name or parts of it
  2. don’t use your pet’s name
  3. don’t use clever passwords like “password123” or 1234567
  4. don’t use your social security number, phone number or address
  5. don’t use common words
  6. don’t use the same password for multiple applications and/or Internet sites

… and the list goes on… When I mentioned rule no. 2, above, one of the trainees said, “Gee, now I have to change my password!”

A “strong” password is eight or more characters long and contains three or more of the following elements

  1. upper case letters (CAPITALS)
  2. lower case letters
  3. numbers
  4. special characters (e.g., $, #, ?, %, !)

Here is a great infographic, How hack-friendly is your password?


Leave a comment

Read the fine print when surfing the Web

We often surf the Web, download documents or apps without reading the Web site terms and conditions and privacy statements. A Time post by Victor Luckerson says that when we use a Web site, we enter into a contract, and we may click “Agree” without knowing what we just agreed to. Companies can track your activities, sell your information and photos and give your information to law enforcement agencies without your knowledge. You may not be able to delete your account on some sites, or may not be able to delete content permanently. And terms can change at any time. So beware!